This is LA: TURF war

Materials & Applications‘s mini-golf project: TURF by nine architects, designers and artists considered topics relevant to Los Angeles today— including all aspects of topography and terrain, drought and lawns, parking and traffic, nature and neighborhood, housing typologies and identity — to create relevant obstacles in the form of the miniature and absurd.

For example, Kyle May writes on his website that the concept behind SiNK originates in California’s complex relationship with water use.

“At first glance, SiNK seems easy, even for a beginner; a seemingly flat roadway, free from any physical obstacles, assures a hole in one. But the field is actually fluid, and upon stepping on the surface, the player’s weight displaces the topography and shifts the direction of the ball in unexpected turns. Two holes side-by-side allow two users to play at once, their movements affecting both their own course’s topography as well as their neighbors’ game. Finally, golf isn’t a solo sport. To win, players must focus on their shot as well as the unseen, but critical, issue of groundwater depletion.”

Sink 3SinkSink (2)

 

Mini-Golf Project explores Los Angeles through the tropes of artificial terrains and fantastical architecture in a nine-hole miniature golf course; particularly curated to make you consciously aware of the surroundings.

Knowhow Shop describes Putt-to-Fit as :

“a mini-golf challenge that uses the plywood tailoring operations developed by Ray and Charles Eames for their iconic leg splint and furniture, applying them on the scale of landscape to tailor a strip of lawn: cutting out darts and stitching it together to create an amplified playing surface that does not rely on obstacles in the landscape to enhance game play, but instead uses the landscape itself. The voids and openings left by the tailoring operations become ‘sand traps’, exposing an arid and drought tolerant surface below: a landscape more in keeping with the native Southern California ecology than the golf courses and lawns that have been imposed on it…can be seen as altering a landscape that no longer fits, like one might alter a garment, turning a traditional water thirsty putting green into a challenging mini-golf hole surrounded by native landscaping.”

 

Put-to-Fit 2Putt-to-FitPut-to-fit 2 (2)

 

Although suggested entrance fee is a 5$ donation, TURF  is a part of the non-profit organization’s dedication to building a public culture of experimental architecture in Los Angeles. M&A’s mission is to advance innovative and critical ideas about architectural design through public projects and programs and produce outdoor installations, workshops, and dialogues in collaboration with architects, artists, and communities across the globe.

 

Or, according to Ordinary Architecture’s website, “Part wind turbine, part-palm tree and part-residential tower, the object addresses issues of densification + verticality, renewable technologies and sustainability and architectural symbolism.  It plays with images of a future LA that is denser, taller and more environmentally responsible whilst also enjoying the city’s historic iconography.” Here’s a rendering of The Electric Palm Tree House:

Electric Palm Tree Turbine House

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“the object addresses issues of densification + verticality, renewable technologies and sustainability and architectural symbolism.  It plays with images of a future LA that is denser, taller and more environmentally responsible whilst also enjoying the city’s historic iconography. – Ordinary Architect

 

 

Open until July 31, TURF transforms a corner parking lot in Echo Park into a fully-operational mini-golf course. The mini-golf course will open to the public Thursday to Sunday, varying from day to day. Materials & Applications was founded in 2002 by Jenna Didier as a collaborative space for experimentation and research in the parking lot of her Silver Lake home.

Turf

Hours of Operation

Thursday: 4pm – 8pm
Friday: 4pm – 8pm
Saturday: 10am – 6pm
Sunday: 10am – 2pm

Previous projects presented by M&A :

La Cage aux Folles

La Cage aux Folles (2014) by Warren Techentin Architecture [WTARCH], explores the little used craft of pipe bending in architecture and joins form, computational procedures, and fabrication processes.

Project S'more

Project S’more (2013) by  New York’s Edmund Ming-Yip Kwong challenges the utility of the non-functional decorative skins that are prevalent in contemporary parametric architecture with a stunning yet economical confederacy of form and function.

Phalanstery Module

Phalanstery Module (2008) was designed by Jimenez Lai, a designer, a comic book author and currently is the LeFevre Fellow in the Knowlton School of Architecture at Ohio State University. This installation grown from the hypothesizes that in zero-gravity, one can rotate (in) architecture and treat all elevations as plans – i.e., walls, ceilings and floors. Without gravity, all surfaces can be occupied. In essence, the distinctions between orthographic drawings become obsolete.

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